Share article

Title

Content

Back

Back

Back

Back

2016 President’s Awards

Generation Zero picks up a President's Award at the 2016 New Zealand Architecture Awards in Wellington.

Photo by David St George

/media/4644/untitled-3.jpg

In 2016, the following people and groups received NZIA President’s Awards:

Peter Elliot 

The television series Art of the Architect told stories about New Zealand architecture in a manner combining enthusiasm for the topic and an awareness of the need to attract the attention of an interested but not specialist audience. As presenter, Peter Elliot conveyed the challenges and rewards of architectural projects while demystifying the design process. In presenting information in an articulate and engaging fashion he effectively communicated the welcome message that architecture matters.

Chris Moller 

The television series Grand Designs tells stories about New Zealand architecture in a manner combining enthusiasm for the topic and an awareness of the need to attract the attention of an interested but not specialist audience. As presenter, Chris Moller conveys the challenges and rewards of architectural projects while demystifying the design process. In presenting information in such an articulate and engaging fashion he effectively communicates the welcome message that architecture matters.

Ken Crosson 

The New Zealand Home tells stories about New Zealand architecture in a manner that combines enthusiasm for the topic and an awareness of the need to attract the attention of an interested but not specialist audience. As presenter, Ken Crosson conveys the challenges and rewards of architectural projects while demystifying the design process. The New Zealand Home admirably responds to a broader remit, placing the development of this country’s residential architecture within the wider context of a century of social and economic history. In presenting information in such an articulate and engaging fashion Ken conveys the welcome message that architecture matters.

Goran Paladin 

The New Zealand Home tells stories about New Zealand architecture in a manner that combines enthusiasm for the topic and an awareness of the need to attract the attention of an interested but not specialist audience. As presenter, Goran Paladin teased out the challenges and rewards of architectural projects while demystifying the design process. The New Zealand Home admirably responds to a broader remit, placing the development of this country’s residential architecture within the wider context of a century of social and economic history. In presenting information in such an articulate and engaging fashion Goran conveys the welcome message that architecture matters.

Generation Zero 

Generation Zero has emerged as an energetic and committed organisation promoting a sustainable future for New Zealanders. Framing its concerns within a wider and urgent consideration of climate change, it has added a fresh and welcome perspective to debates about urban issues. The group has mounted important public education campaigns, in particular in the areas of voter enrolment, housing and transportation. Generation Zero worked with the Institute of Architects and Urban Design Forum on Auckland Unitary Plan submissions, advocating for better zoning, design-led development controls and urban intensification in order to address the housing crisis – a contribution acknowledged in the report of the Independent Hearings Panel. 

James Blackburne 

James Blackburne has devoted a huge amount of time and effort to communicating the importance of John Scott’s Aniwaniwa Visitor Centre and trying to save it from its needless, and heedless, demolition. He helped expose a saga of official neglect and worked energetically to explore options which may have preserved the Category One Historic Place. His resolute championing of an important work by one of New Zealand’s most significant architects has inspired his professional colleagues, and has been appreciated in the wider community.

Graham Linwood  

Graham Linwood has devoted a huge amount of time and effort to communicating the importance of John Scott’s Aniwaniwa Visitor Centre and trying to save it from its needless, and heedless, demolition. He helped expose a saga of official neglect and worked energetically to explore options which may have preserved the Category One Historic Place. His resolute championing of an important work by one of New Zealand’s most significant architects has inspired his professional colleagues, and has been appreciated in the wider community. 

Jacob Scott 

Jacob Scott has devoted a huge amount of time and effort to communicating the importance of John Scott’s Aniwaniwa Visitor Centre and trying to save it from its needless, and heedless, demolition. At a difficult time for him and his family Jacob resolutely championed an important work by one of New Zealand’s most significant architects, standing up against official indifference and considerable pressure in defence of a Category One heritage building. 

Gregory O’Brien 

Greg O’Brien has been outspoken and eloquent in his championing of two Category One heritage buildings designed by John Scott, Futuna Chapel and the Aniwaniwa Visitor Centre. With Nick Bevin, Greg edited Futuna: Life of a Building, an engaging and informative history of one of New Zealand’s great modernist buildings. Greg then advocated, energetically, on behalf of the Aniwaniwa Visitor Centre, which was, shamefully, demolished by order of the Department of Conservation. It is good to know New Zealand’s architecture has such a staunch defender.